15 States Challenging Trump’s Decision To Rescind DACA…

It will be interesting to see where this goes. If anywhere.

LOS ANGELES — California and three other states on Monday added to a barrage of states challenging President Donald Trump’s decision to rescind protections for undocumented people brought to the United States illegally as children.
The lawsuit, in which California was joined by Minnesota, Maryland and Maine, comes five days after 15 states and the District of Columbia first filed suit to defend the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

Flanked by two DACA recipients in Sacramento, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra called Trump’s order “unlawful and mean-spirited,” arguing it violates due process provisions of the Constitution and would hurt the economy in the nation’s most populous state.

“You don’t become the sixth-largest economy in the world just because,” Becerra said. “It just so happens that one of every four of the DACA recipients in this country — some 200,000 — live and work and call California their home, and they’ve been helping California become the sixth-largest economy in the world.”

He said repealing DACA would unfairly punish productive, law-abiding young people and that the economic cost of deporting them “would be felt by California businesses, California local governments who have depended on the economic success of the DACA program.”

The Trump administration has said the Obama-era executive order is unconstitutional, while Trump said last week that he will delay ending DACA for six months in order to give lawmakers time to craft a legislative solution to protect so-called Dreamers.

More than 200,000 DACA recipients live in California, about one in every four recipients nationwide.

More BELOW THE FOLD.

Perhaps the only good thing that might come of Trump’s decision is it could force the gutless GOP in congress to confront the immigration issue, work with democrats, and ultimately pass into law an equitable, fair, and sensible immigration law.

We can hope.

Trump Again Shows His Heartlessness and Xenophobia…

Trump, pandering to his xenophobic base announces the end of DACA.

A member of Trump’s diversity coalition announces his resignation.

A real President of the United States of America speaks up.

Washington (CNN) – Javier Palomarez, the head of the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, announced he was resigning from President Donald Trump’s diversity coalition over the administration’s decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

Palomarez announced his decision on Tuesday morning, expressing his strong disagreement with the Trump administration on immigration.

“I tried to work as hard as I could with this administration on this issue, and I continue to want to work with them on other issues, like tax reform, like health care reform, and so many other important things,” Palomarez told HLN’s Carol Costello. “But I really don’t see the logic in doing what we’re doing right now.”

He continued, “I am resigning right now from that council.”
Palomarez said his on-air proclamation served as his resignation.

We salute Palomarez’s decision and encourage all politicians with a conscience to support the opposition to Trump’s foolish and self-defeating decision.

And now, thoughts from a former and REAL President of the Untied States.

Immigration can be a controversial topic. We all want safe, secure borders and a dynamic economy, and people of goodwill can have legitimate disagreements about how to fix our immigration system so that everybody plays by the rules.

But that’s not what the action that the White House took today is about. This is about young people who grew up in America — kids who study in our schools, young adults who are starting careers, patriots who pledge allegiance to our flag. These Dreamers are Americans in their hearts, in their minds, in every single way but one: on paper. They were brought to this country by their parents, sometimes even as infants. They may not know a country besides ours. They may not even know a language besides English. They often have no idea they’re undocumented until they apply for a job, or college, or a driver’s license.

Over the years, politicians of both parties have worked together to write legislation that would have told these young people — our young people — that if your parents brought you here as a child, if you’ve been here a certain number of years, and if you’re willing to go to college or serve in our military, then you’ll get a chance to stay and earn your citizenship. And for years while I was President, I asked Congress to send me such a bill.

That bill never came. And because it made no sense to expel talented, driven, patriotic young people from the only country they know solely because of the actions of their parents, my administration acted to lift the shadow of deportation from these young people, so that they could continue to contribute to our communities and our country. We did so based on the well-established legal principle of prosecutorial discretion, deployed by Democratic and Republican presidents alike, because our immigration enforcement agencies have limited resources, and it makes sense to focus those resources on those who come illegally to this country to do us harm. Deportations of criminals went up. Some 800,000 young people stepped forward, met rigorous requirements, and went through background checks. And America grew stronger as a result.

But today, that shadow has been cast over some of our best and brightest young people once again. To target these young people is wrong — because they have done nothing wrong. It is self-defeating — because they want to start new businesses, staff our labs, serve in our military, and otherwise contribute to the country we love. And it is cruel. What if our kid’s science teacher, or our friendly neighbor turns out to be a Dreamer? Where are we supposed to send her? To a country she doesn’t know or remember, with a language she may not even speak?

Let’s be clear: the action taken today isn’t required legally. It’s a political decision, and a moral question. Whatever concerns or complaints Americans may have about immigration in general, we shouldn’t threaten the future of this group of young people who are here through no fault of their own, who pose no threat, who are not taking away anything from the rest of us. They are that pitcher on our kid’s softball team, that first responder who helps out his community after a disaster, that cadet in ROTC who wants nothing more than to wear the uniform of the country that gave him a chance. Kicking them out won’t lower the unemployment rate, or lighten anyone’s taxes, or raise anybody’s wages.

It is precisely because this action is contrary to our spirit, and to common sense, that business leaders, faith leaders, economists, and Americans of all political stripes called on the administration not to do what it did today. And now that the White House has shifted its responsibility for these young people to Congress, it’s up to Members of Congress to protect these young people and our future. I’m heartened by those who’ve suggested that they should. And I join my voice with the majority of Americans who hope they step up and do it with a sense of moral urgency that matches the urgency these young people feel.

Ultimately, this is about basic decency. This is about whether we are a people who kick hopeful young strivers out of America, or whether we treat them the way we’d want our own kids to be treated. It’s about who we are as a people — and who we want to be.

What makes us American is not a question of what we look like, or where our names come from, or the way we pray. What makes us American is our fidelity to a set of ideals — that all of us are created equal; that all of us deserve the chance to make of our lives what we will; that all of us share an obligation to stand up, speak out, and secure our most cherished values for the next generation. That’s how America has traveled this far. That’s how, if we keep at it, we will ultimately reach that more perfect union.

Real and true patriotic Americans grasp the truth and wisdom of President Obama’s words. We are hopeful that a overwhelming majority of our elected officials from both parties do as well.

 

 

As It Ought To Be And Can Be, When Trump Is Out Of The White House…

Now THIS is what we’re talkin about!

George W. Bush: Bill Clinton is a “brother with a different mother”

Former presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton shared a stage Thursday night at a leadership summit in Dallas to share what they’ve learned in their days before, during and after the presidency.

The two former presidents, although they’re from opposite parties, said they share much in common, they noted at a Presidential Leadership Scholars conference at the George W. Bush Presidential Center. They are two of only 13 presidents in U.S. history to serve two consecutive terms, and Mr. Bush, at 71, is only 44 days older than Mr. Clinton, 70. They were also both governors of southern states — Mr. Bush of Texas, and Mr. Clinton of Arkansas. Mr. Bush’s father, former President George H. W. Bush, also aided Mr. Clinton as he entered the presidency in 1992, as Mr. Clinton in turn did for the younger Mr. Bush in 2000. To this day, Mr. Clinton has annual visits with George H. W. Bush.

The pair joked about their friendship, despite Mr. Clinton beating Mr. Bush’s father in 1992.

Mr. Bush said it “starts with [him] being a person refusing to lord his victory over dad. Dad was willing to rise above the political contest. Both men displayed strong character. Why do I have a friendship with him? Well, he’s called a brother with a different mother.”

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But Mr. Clinton also had some words of caution for the future. He noted that in today’s digital age, people “get news in silos,” and, without mentioning President Trump said the U.S. “can’t continue to grow this economy” without immigrants.

“One of things wrong with America is we have separated ourselves in like-minded communities,” Mr. Clinton said. “We don’t want to be around with people who disagree with us typically. And we get news in silos. Diverse groups make better decisions then homogenous ones.”

To anyone hoping to run for president, Mr. Clinton said they need to answer a fundamental question: “But why in the heck are you running?”
“If you want to be president, realize it’s about the people, not about you,” Mr. Clinton added.

Full article BELOW THE FOLD.

 

Are Trump’s Political Waters Getting Hotter?…

I suppose this could be called Breaking News, but, is it really? It sure doesn’t help the Trump case regarding the alleged Russian Trump connection that’s for sure. It does however lend more credence to the story on Russian interference in the 2016 US presidential election.

abc NEWS – Donald Trump Jr. and Jared Kushner met with a Russian lawyer who has connections to the Kremlin last spring, just after candidate Donald Trump had clinched the Republican nomination for the presidency, ABC News has confirmed.

According to a report first published Saturday by the New York Times citing confidential government records that were described to the newspaper, the meeting took place at Trump Tower between Trump Jr., Kushner and Natalia Veselnitskaya, a Russian attorney, on June 9, 2016.

A source familiar with this meeting confirms to ABC News that Trump Jr. and Kushner did indeed meet with Veselnitskaya. The source said the campaign was not discussed; it is unclear at this time what was in fact discussed at the 2016 meeting. This same source described the Times report as accurate. The Times reports that the meeting was also attended by Paul Manafort, who was Trump’s campaign chairman at the time.

This is the first confirmation of a meeting between members of Trump’s family and Russians during his campaign for the presidency.

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The meeting was only disclosed by Kushner recently, when the senior White House aide re-submitted a form necessary for his security clearance. Kushner’s attorney Jamie Gorelick released a statement on Saturday regarding the revelation, explaining that the form was originally submitted before it should have been.

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Veselnitskaya is best known for her work against the Magnitsky Act, a 2012 bill that blocks certain Russian officials’ entrance to the U.S. and their use of the U.S. banking system.

The Magnitsky Act was largely a response to the death of Russian lawyer Sergei Magnitsky in a Moscow prison in 2009. Magnitsky was killed by Russian police after he uncovered a huge tax fraud scheme linked to the top levels of the Russian state. The act serves as a blacklist that targets Russian officials involved in the murder and its cover-up.

Complete story BELOW THE FOLD.

Action Against All Undocumented Immigrants To Increase…

So, who’s running deportation efforts/actions? Trump’s “official” aims did not go as far as the story below. Perhaps the “official” statements from the Trump camp are muses? We’ll wait…

From Pro Publica – The head of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement unit in charge of deportations has directed his officers to take action against all undocumented immigrants they may cross paths with, regardless of criminal histories. The guidance appears to go beyond the Trump administration’s publicly stated aims, and some advocates say may explain a marked increase in immigration arrests.

In a February memo, Matthew Albence, a career official who heads the Enforcement and Removal Operations division of ICE, informed his 5,700 deportation officers that, “effective immediately, ERO officers will take enforcement action against all removable aliens encountered in the course of their duties.”

The Trump administration, including Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly, has been clear in promising to ramp up immigration enforcement, but has so far emphasized that its priority was deporting immigrants who posed a public safety threat. Indeed, Kelly, to whom Albence ultimately reports, had seemed to suggest a degree of discretion when he told the agencies under his command earlier this year that immigration officers “may” initiate enforcement actions against any undocumented person they encountered. That guidance was issued just a day before Albence sent the memo to his staff.

Full story continues BELOW THE FOLD.