Is Independence Day a Public Holiday?

Many people display the American flag outside their homes or buildings. Many communities arrange fireworks that are often accompanied by patriotic music. The most impressive fireworks are shown on television. Some employees use one or more of their vacation days to create a long weekend so that they can escape the heat at their favorite beach or vacation spot.

Independence Day is a day of family celebrations with picnics and barbecues, showing a great deal of emphasis on the American tradition of political freedom. Activities associated with the day include watermelon or hotdog eating competitions and sporting events, such as baseball games, three-legged races, swimming activities and tug-of-war games.

Many people display the American flag outside their homes or buildings. Many communities arrange fireworks that are often accompanied by patriotic music. The most impressive fireworks are shown on television. Some employees use one or more of their vacation days to create a long weekend so that they can escape the heat at their favorite beach or vacation spot.

Independence Day is a day of family celebrations with picnics and barbecues, showing a great deal of emphasis on the American tradition of political freedom. Activities associated with the day include watermelon or hotdog eating competitions and sporting events, such as baseball games, three-legged races, swimming activities and tug-of-war games.

Independence Day is a patriotic holiday for celebrating the positive aspects of the United States. Many politicians appear at public events to show their support for the history, heritage and people of their country. Above all, people in the United States express and give thanks for the freedom and liberties fought by the first generation of many of today’s Americans. The Statue of Liberty is a national monument that is associated with Independence Day.

Independence Day is a day of family celebrations with picnics and barbecues, showing a great deal of emphasis on the American tradition of political freedom. Activities associated with the day include watermelon or hotdog eating competitions and sporting events, such as baseball games, three-legged races, swimming activities and tug-of-war games.

Independence Day is a patriotic holiday for celebrating the positive aspects of the United States. Many politicians appear at public events to show their support for the history, heritage and people of their country. Above all, people in the United States express and give thanks for the freedom and liberties fought by the first generation of many of today’s Americans. The Statue of Liberty is a national monument that is associated with Independence Day.

Many people display the American flag outside their homes or buildings. Many communities arrange fireworks that are often accompanied by patriotic music. The most impressive fireworks are shown on television. Some employees use one or more of their vacation days to create a long weekend so that they can escape the heat at their favorite beach or vacation spot.

Independence Day is a day of family celebrations with picnics and barbecues, showing a great deal of emphasis on the American tradition of political freedom. Activities associated with the day include watermelon or hotdog eating competitions and sporting events, such as baseball games, three-legged races, swimming activities and tug-of-war games.

Many people display the American flag outside their homes or buildings. Many communities arrange fireworks that are often accompanied by patriotic music. The most impressive fireworks are shown on television. Some employees use one or more of their vacation days to create a long weekend so that they can escape the heat at their favorite beach or vacation spot.

Independence Day is a day of family celebrations with picnics and barbecues, showing a great deal of emphasis on the American tradition of political freedom. Activities associated with the day include watermelon or hotdog eating competitions and sporting events, such as baseball games, three-legged races, swimming activities and tug-of-war games.

Independence Day is a patriotic holiday for celebrating the positive aspects of the United States. Many politicians appear at public events to show their support for the history, heritage and people of their country. Above all, people in the United States express and give thanks for the freedom and liberties fought by the first generation of many of today’s Americans. The Statue of Liberty is a national monument that is associated with Independence Day.

Independence Day is a day of family celebrations with picnics and barbecues, showing a great deal of emphasis on the American tradition of political freedom. Activities associated with the day include watermelon or hotdog eating competitions and sporting events, such as baseball games, three-legged races, swimming activities and tug-of-war games.

Independence Day is a patriotic holiday for celebrating the positive aspects of the United States. Many politicians appear at public events to show their support for the history, heritage and people of their country. Above all, people in the United States express and give thanks for the freedom and liberties fought by the first generation of many of today’s Americans. The Statue of Liberty is a national monument that is associated with Independence Day.

Public Life

There are many public events, parades, shows and fireworks displays. This may cause local disruption to traffic. Public transit systems do not usually operate on their regular timetables.

Independence Day is a federal holiday. If July 4 is a Saturday, it is observed on Friday, July 3. If July 4 is a Sunday, it is observed on Monday, July 5. Government offices and schools are closed. Some businesses may be closed as well. In some years, many employees use a proportion of their vacation days to create a long weekend. This can cause congestion in some places, particularly towards popular holiday destinations.

About Independence Day

In 1775, people in New England began fighting the British for their independence. On July 2, 1776, the Congress secretly voted for independence from Great Britain. Two days later, on July 4, 1776, the final wording of the Declaration of Independence was approved, and the document was published. The first public reading of the Declaration of Independence was on July 8, 1776. Delegates began to sign the Declaration of Independence on August 2, 1776. In 1870, Independence Day was made an unpaid holiday for federal employees. In 1941, it became a paid holiday for them.

The first description of how Independence Day would be celebrated was in a letter from John Adams to his wife Abigail on July 3, 1776. He described “pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations” throughout the United States. However, the term “Independence Day” was not used until 1791.

Interestingly, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, both signers of the Declaration of Independence and presidents of the United States, died on July 4, 1826 – exactly 50 years after the adoption of the declaration. It is also important to note that Native Americans lived in the country and each tribe had its own nation and government prior to the European settlers.

SOURCE

A Happy July 4th To All That Understand What It Means To Love America!

Reparations or No Reparations……

Something all democrats and republicans should listen to and consider. Put aside ideology and partisan bias and consider the truth spoken by  Burgess Owens.

When reason and logic is used, something Mr. Owens used magnificetly, we become a beter nation for it.

October Thoughts As the Foliage In New England Turns To Looking Like America…

I’ve blogged as a conservative, a libertarian, an independent, and most recently as a liberal. Some might say that is because I have no center, no core values. Nothing could be further from the truth. In fact I have very strong core beliefs, they have been with me since as far back as I can remember, and, that is a very long time.

Honesty, integrity, hard work, accepting personal responsibility for oneself, being accountable for your decisions and actions, being productive and making a difference, standing up for truth whether it comes from the right, the center, or the left, being willing to live and let live, learning from others at every opportunity, understanding that emotional intelligence can sometimes be more important than your IQ, understanding that a person’s perceptions are their reality whether right or not, being considerate of others, and, to quote Steven Covey, Seek first to understand and then to be understood are all part of my core values. The fact is, most people share these values.

Our political environment has become so polarized and fiercely partisan with the winner take all attitude that as a people we have forgotten that working together, solving mutual problems, and building bridges is the only path to achieving long-term lasting success and social harmony. Our nation is made up of people and cultures from across the globe with ideas and perceptions as varied as the colors of falling leaves in Autumn in New England.

Finding a way to blend the varied ideas and perceptions of our people is our task, and, it should be our goal.  Each and every one of us, including and especially the President of the United States, is responsible for making this happen. Unfortunately the forces working to divide us have achieved the upper hand. “If a house is divided against itself, that house cannot stand” , these words taken from the Gospel of Gospel of St. Mark are as true today as they were when they were written. They are words every American, regardless of color, ethnicity, or national origin ought to think about in earnest, and, do so daily.  Especially our elected leaders.

Responsibility rests with all sides to right our ship. Isn’t it time we get busy doing so?

We Must Preserve The Open Internet…

NET NUETRALITY DAY

 

Save The Open Internet

 

Do your part, others have.

 

June 14, 2016: The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia fully upheld the FCC’s net neutrality rules. Today’s ruling is a victory for the open, fair, and free Internet as we know it today — one that remains open to innovation and economic growth, without service providers serving as paid gatekeepers. It’s also a victory for the millions of Americans who made their voices heard in support of a free and fair Internet, with countless others speaking out on social media, petitioning their government, and standing up for what they believe.
February 26, 2015:The FCC just voted in favor of strong net neutrality rules to keep the Internet open and free. That happened because millions of Americans across the country didn’t just care about this issue: You stood up and made your voices heard, whether by adding your names to petitions, submitting public comments, or talking with the people you know about why this matters. Read a special thank-you message from the President, then learn more about how we got to where we are today.