Have a Great Weekend and Super Patriotic Independence Day…

The Trump Edition

 

As we leave for the Independence Day weekend, or not, we leave you with these tidbits of info related to the BLOTUS…

President Trump Deserves Credit For Taking On Bullies Like Mika Brzezinski

 

Silicon Valley Women, in Cultural Shift, Frankly Describe Sexual Harassment

Conservative outlets get more official seats in White House briefing room

Why some inside the White House see Trump’s media feud as ‘winning’

White House releases salaries of top Trump staffers

The White House had a coordinated message this month. Trump didn’t.

Hosemann on Trump voter ID request: ‘Go jump in the Gulf’

Exclusive! Mika Brzezinski: “This Is a Sign Of a Much Bigger Problem”

Trump Backers ‘Furious’ That Senator Stood Against Health Care Bill

The Trump Administration Is Planning an Unprecedented Attack on Voting Rights 

Trump overrules cabinet, plots global trade war

Here’s The Audio Of Donald Trump’s Private RNC Fundraiser At His Own Hotel

White House council for women and girls goes dark under Trump

 

HAVE A SAFE ENJOYABLE WEEKEND AND HOLIDAY!

 

 

 

 

Terror In Tehran…

Perhaps the USA and others ought to consider taking on Iran as an ally in their fight against ISIS extremism. Iran, if properly respected by the Trump administration and the USA might just prove to be of great value. Just sayin…

Tehran, Iran (CNN) – Attackers have mounted simultaneous gun and suicide bomb assaults on Iran’s parliament building and the tomb of the republic’s revolutionary founder, in one of the most audacious assaults to hit Tehran in decades.

At least 12 people were killed and dozens more injured in the twin assaults on the Iranian capital, state media reported. A third attack was foiled, Iran’s Intelligence Ministry said.
ISIS issued a swift claim of responsibility. Its media wing, Amaq, claimed “fighters with the Islamic State” carried out the attack, but did not offer evidence.
By choosing the burial site of Iran’s revered revolutionary leader, and the national legislative forum, the attackers picked highly symbolic targets.
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The parliament, the Islamic Consultative Assembly or Majlis, is Iran’s principal legislative body. It has 290 members, including women, and there are representatives of religious minorities including Christians, Zoroastrians and Jews.
Gun ownership is heavily controlled in Iran, raising speculation that the attackers smuggled weapons into the country.
Iran — with its largely Shiite population — has been involved in military actions against Sunni terrorist groups such as ISIS, who regard Shiites as apostates, but such terror attacks in the country are rare.
Last year, Iran’s government said it thwarted “one of the biggest plots” by terror groups targeting Tehran and other major cities during the month of Ramadan. This year’s holy month started almost two weeks ago on May 26.
The last major attack in Iran was in 2010 when a Sunni extremist group carried out a suicide attack against a mosque in Sistan-Baluchistan killing 39 people. Kurdish groups have carried out small scale attacks against Iranian security forces in the north-west of the country.
Foll article BELOW THE FOLD.

Putin Suggests US Hackers Framed Russia…

Oh yeah, the bros are working it.  Fake news from Trump and hackers from anywhere (including the USA) from Putin. Hmm, the dictatorial thugs seem to be in lockstep. Be suspicious, very suspicious.

NBC NEWS – Russian President Vladimir Putin found himself on the defensive Friday when asked by NBC News’ Megyn Kelly to explain his earlier claim that private “patriotic” hackers could have interfered in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

Putin, in an exclusive interview with Kelly, insisted the hackers could have come from “anywhere” and then they could have — in a savvy and professional way — shifted the blame to make it look like Russia was behind the hacking.

“Hackers can be anywhere. They can be in Russia, in Asia…even in America, Latin America,” he said. “They can even be hackers, by the way, in the United States who very skillfully and professionally shifted the blame, as we say, onto Russia. Can you imagine something like that? In the midst of a political battle?”

“By some calculations it was convenient for them to release this information, so they released it, citing Russia,” Putin added. “Could you imagine something like that? I can.”

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“They might have read a certain article and if they are in the patriotic mood, then they start making their contributions the way they see it positive towards the Russian image,” Putin told reporters, according to an Associated Press translation.

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Echoing remarks President Donald Trump made on the campaign trail, Putin also questioned the need for NATO.

“NATO was established as a Cold War instrument in the fight against the Soviet Union,” Putin said through a translator. “There is no longer any … Soviet Union.”

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The U.S. intelligence community believes Putin ordered the hacking, most likely to undermine Hillary Clinton and boost Trump. But Putin has steadfastly denied the allegations.

Trump, during the campaign, repeatedly denied Russia was trying to tip the scales in his favor. He finally conceded in January that Russia has waged cyberattacks on America but insisted they had “absolutely no effect on the outcome.”

Full article HERE.

Memorial Day, The Meaning Of…

In light of the fact many Americans do not know the history of or the meaning of Memorial Day we think the following reminder is appropriate.

Each May, the United States celebrates a day called Memorial Day. Does Memorial Day have meaning? What is the history of Memorial Day?

Memorial Day was first widely observed in May 1868. The celebration commemorated the sacrifices of the Civil War and the proclamation was made by General John A Logan. Following the proclamation, participants decorated graves of more than 20,000 Union and Confederate soldiers.

In years since World War 1, the day has become a celebration of honor for those who died in all America’s wars, as well as those who are Veterans and current members of the US military.

In 1971, Memorial Day was declared a national holiday. The United States celebrates this holiday the last Monday of May.

President Ronald Reagan is credited with reviving the practice of honoring Memorial Day and its meaning. One of his famous speeches was given at Arlington National Cemetery on Memorial Day in 1986.

The Speech

“Today is the day we put aside to remember fallen heroes and to pray that no heroes will ever have to die for us again. It’s a day of thanks for the valor of others, a day to remember the splendor of America and those of her children who rest in this cemetery and others. It’s a day to be with the family and remember.

“I was thinking this morning that across the country children and their parents will be going to the town parade and the young ones will sit on the sidewalks and wave their flags as the band goes by. Later, maybe, they’ll have a cookout or a day at the beach. And that’s good, because today is a day to be with the family and to remember.

“Arlington, this place of so many memories, is a fitting place for some remembering. So many wonderful men and women rest here, men and women who led colorful, vivid, and passionate lives. There are the greats of the military: Bull Halsey and the Admirals Leahy, father and son; Black Jack Pershing; and the GI’s general, Omar Bradley. Great men all, military men. But there are others here known for other things.

“Here in Arlington rests a sharecropper’s son who became a hero to a lonely people. Joe Louis came from nowhere, but he knew how to fight. And he galvanized a nation in the days after Pearl Harbor when he put on the uniform of his country and said, ‘I know we’ll win because we’re on God’s side.’ Audie Murphy is here, Audie Murphy of the wild, wild courage. For what else would you call it when a man bounds to the top of a disabled tank, stops an enemy advance, saves lives, and rallies his men, and all of it single-handedly. When he radioed for artillery support and was asked how close the enemy was to his position, he said, ‘Wait a minute and I’ll let you speak to them.’ [Laughter]

“Michael Smith is here, and Dick Scobee, both of the space shuttle Challenger. Their courage wasn’t wild, but thoughtful, the mature and measured courage of career professionals who took prudent risks for great reward—in their case, to advance the sum total of knowledge in the world. They’re only the latest to rest here; they join other great explorers with names like Grissom and Chaffee.

“Oliver Wendell Holmes is here, the great jurist and fighter for the right. A poet searching for an image of true majesty could not rest until he seized on ‘Holmes dissenting in a sordid age.’ Young Holmes served in the Civil War. He might have been thinking of the crosses and stars of Arlington when he wrote: ‘At the grave of a hero we end, not with sorrow at the inevitable loss, but with the contagion of his courage; and with a kind of desperate joy we go back to the fight.’

“All of these men were different, but they shared this in common: They loved America very much. There was nothing they wouldn’t do for her. And they loved with the sureness of the young. It’s hard not to think of the young in a place like this, for it’s the young who do the fighting and dying when a peace fails and a war begins. Not far from here is the statue of the three servicemen—the three fighting boys of Vietnam. It, too, has majesty and more. Perhaps you’ve seen it—three rough boys walking together, looking ahead with a steady gaze. There’s something wounded about them, a kind of resigned toughness. But there’s an unexpected tenderness, too. At first you don’t really notice, but then you see it. The three are touching each other, as if they’re supporting each other, helping each other on.

“I know that many veterans of Vietnam will gather today, some of them perhaps by the wall. And they’re still helping each other on. They were quite a group, the boys of Vietnam—boys who fought a terrible and vicious war without enough support from home, boys who were dodging bullets while we debated the efficacy of the battle. It was often our poor who fought in that war; it was the unpampered boys of the working class who picked up the rifles and went on the march. They learned not to rely on us; they learned to rely on each other. And they were special in another way: They chose to be faithful. They chose to reject the fashionable skepticism of their time. They chose to believe and answer the call of duty. They had the wild, wild courage of youth. They seized certainty from the heart of an ambivalent age; they stood for something.

“And we owe them something, those boys. We owe them first a promise: That just as they did not forget their missing comrades, neither, ever, will we. And there are other promises. We must always remember that peace is a fragile thing that needs constant vigilance. We owe them a promise to look at the world with a steady gaze and, perhaps, a resigned toughness, knowing that we have adversaries in the world and challenges and the only way to meet them and maintain the peace is by staying strong.

“That, of course, is the lesson of this century, a lesson learned in the Sudetenland, in Poland, in Hungary, in Czechoslovakia, in Cambodia. If we really care about peace, we must stay strong. If we really care about peace, we must, through our strength, demonstrate our unwillingness to accept an ending of the peace. We must be strong enough to create peace where it does not exist and strong enough to protect it where it does. That’s the lesson of this century and, I think, of this day. And that’s all I wanted to say. The rest of my contribution is to leave this great place to its peace, a peace it has earned.

“Thank all of you, and God bless you, and have a day full of memories.”

SOURCE

To all the brave men and women, both past and presents, we salute and thank you for your sacrifice so that we may remain free.